Literature Soundtracks

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Grade Level
High School
Subject
Literature
Length of Time
One fity minute period to work
Description

The student will choose ten songs to create a soundtrack for a novel read in class or as outside reading. In the liner notes, instead of lyrics the students writes a rationale of why or how the song relates to the novel in terms of setting, conflict, character, or mood. The student will design the CD jacket insert, and the pitch the CD to the production company (the class).

Goals

The students will perform a low stakes literary analysis, using their ability to find and apply their own analysis of theme, setting, conflict, character, and mood.

Materials Needed

Markers, pens, paper, staples, rulers, and scissors.

Procedure

1. Tell the students are required to put themselves in the role of music director for the movie version of the book that they have read in class or as outside reading. They will create and design the CD jacket insert as well as choose the songs.

2. Students must analyze the novel in order to choose 10 songs that they feel would be used in the sound track for the imaginary film. Students may not use any songs that have been recorded for previously produced productions of any of the novels.

3. Students will also write an explanation for each song that they choose (approximately one paragraph in length) discussing how it fits for their imaginary film. These paragraphs should be where the lyrics would normally be in a CD insert. The paragraphs should follow this idea:

I chose the song "Wild Thing" to represent the character of Scarlet because she is fiery and wild like a untamed animal throughout the novel. She shows the tenacity of a lion on the hunt, never giving up until she gets what she wants. This song is an appropraite choice for her because she entralls all the men that she comes in contact with.

or

I chose this piece of classical music because the mood of the novel at certain points is very grim and desperate. This music has the same feel, making the listener feel the desperation.

Each song should represent a different form of literary analysis.

4. Student should decorate their CD jacket inserts.

5. Finally, each student will need to convince, or sell, the producers (the rest of the class) that this is the appropriate sound track that they need to purchase for the film. To make it more business like, have the students dress up for this presentation.

Grading

Use the following rubric for the project with four being the highest and one being the lowest mark in each category.

A- Support for Topic:

4. Relevant, telling quality details give the reader important information from the text that shows deeper level thought in the song selection and reasoning. The student shows clear connections to character and theme.

3. Relevant, some details give the reader important information from the text that shows deeper level thought in the song selection and reasoning. The student shows some connections to character and theme.



2. Supporting details and information are relevant, but several key issues or portions of the soundtrack are unsupported or do not relate to the text.

1. Supporting details and information are typically unclear or not related to the text.

B- Soundtrack Paragraph's Grammar & Spelling:

4. Writer makes no or few errors in grammar or spelling that distract the reader from the content.

3. Writer makes some errors in grammar or spelling that distract the reader from the content.

2. Writer makes several errors in grammar or spelling that distract the reader from the content.

1. Writer makes several errors in grammar or spelling that greatly distract the reader from the content.

C- Soundtrack Presentation:

4. Neatly presented, shows thought and creativity. Well displayed and neat.

3. Average presentation.Well displayed and neat.

2. Minimal effort in neatness.

1. Sloppy handwriting or poor printing quality.

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