Exploring Allegory - John Bunyan

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Grade Level
High School
Subject
Literature
Length of Time
1 hour
Description

Students will read Pilgrim's Progress and give specific examples in the text as to why this is an allegory.

Goals

Students will learn:
About allegories
To find characteristics of allegory in a literary work

Materials Needed

Pilgrim's Progress
Note cards for taking notes
Notebook paper
Pens and whiteouts

Procedure

First, you will have students read Pilgrim's Progress by John Bunyan.

Then, you will have them write an essay explaining the characteristics of allegory. You can also have them explain why Pilgrim's Progress is an allegory.

When they have finished their essay, they can submit them for you to grade.

This assignment will take more than one class period. You can have them read Pilgrim's Progress and take notes as a homework assignment. Then, write their essay in class.

Grading

You can grade their papers on grammar, spelling, punctuation, sentence structure, and paragraph structure.

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